Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Come to Jamaica Mon and Feel Alright

On The Menu

 Jerk Sauce
Yields 1½ cups
 Ingredients
½ cup allspice berries
½ cup packed brown sugar
6-8 garlic cloves
4-6 Scotch bonnet peppers
1 tablespoon ground thyme or 2 tablespoons thyme leaves
1- 2 bunches scallions (green onions)
1 teaspoon cinnamon
½ teaspoon nutmeg
salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoon soy sauce to moisten

Method
Put content in a food processor or blender and liquefy
Pour sauce in a Jar and keep refrigerated.
The sauce will keep forever if kept refrigerated


Jamaican Jerk Chicken
4 – 6 Servings
Ingredients
1- 3lbs chicken
Lemon or lime juice

Method
Preheat oven or grill to 250 degrees F
Clean, skin, and cut chicken
Wash with lime or lemon juice
Rub the chicken pieces with the Jerk sauce
Marinate overnight.
Grill at lowest possible setting over a low fire until done
Jamaican Rice and Peas
6 Servings

Ingredients
1 cup dried red kidney beans
3 ½ cup water
1 Scotch bonnet pepper
2 clove garlic, sliced
3 whole allspice berries
3 dried thyme sprigs
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 teaspoon pepper
2 stalks scallion, cut on the bias
1 cup coconut milk
2 cups uncooked rice

Method
In a large pot, add the peas, water scotch bonnet pepper, garlic cloves, allspice berries, thyme, salt, pepper and scallions. Bring pot up to a low boil, stir reduce heat to medium, partially cover and cook 1 hour or until beans are fork tender. Add additional water to keep beans covered by at least 1 inch of water.
Once beans are fork tender add the coconut milk and continue cooking until milk is no longer white and has taken on the color of the beans.
Add the rice, cover and cook another 15 minutes or until rice is done.
Remove from heat immediately let pot sit at least 5 minutes. Remove thyme sprigs and scotch bonnet pepper before serving.

Jamaican Steamed Cabbage
6 Servings
Ingredients
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium bell pepper, sliced
1 scotch bonnet pepper, seeded, minced
1 medium onion, sliced
2 sprig thyme
1 bay leaf
1 medium cabbage
2 teaspoons granulated garlic
Freshly ground pepper and salt to taste
¼ cup water

Method
Wash cabbage, cut up/slice as desired
In a large pan, heat oil, add peppers, onions, thyme and bay leaf saute until onions are wilted.
Add cabbage, seasoning and, cover saucepan and cook until cabbage is tender. Approximately 15 minutes.
Remove thyme sprigs and bay leaf before serving





Jerk Sauce

 Jerk Sauce
Yields 1½ cups

Ingredients
½ cup allspice berries
½ cup packed brown sugar
6-8 garlic cloves
4-6 Scotch bonnet peppers
1 tablespoon ground thyme or 2 tablespoons thyme leaves
1- 2 bunches scallions (green onions)
1 teaspoon cinnamon
½ teaspoon nutmeg
salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoon soy sauce to moisten

Method
Put content in a food processor or blender and liquefy
Pour sauce in a Jar and keep refrigerated.
The sauce will keep forever if kept refrigerated

Jamaican Jerk Chicken




Jamaican Jerk Chicken
4 – 6 Servings


Ingredients
1- 3lbs chicken
Lemon or lime juice

Method
Preheat oven or grill to 250 degrees F
Clean, skin, and cut chicken
Wash with lime or lemon juice
Rub the chicken pieces with the Jerk sauce
Marinate overnight.
Grill at lowest possible setting over a low fire until done

Jamaican Rice and Peas

Jamaican Rice and Peas
6 Servings 

Ingredients
1 cup dried red kidney beans
3 ½ cup water
1 Scotch bonnet pepper
2 clove garlic, sliced
3 whole allspice berries
3 dried thyme sprigs
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 teaspoon pepper
2 stalks scallion, cut on the bias
1 cup coconut milk
2 cups uncooked rice 


Method
In a large pot, add the peas, water scotch bonnet pepper, garlic cloves, allspice berries, thyme, salt, pepper and scallions. Bring pot up to a low boil, stir reduce heat to medium, partially cover and cook 1 hour or until beans are fork tender. Add additional water to keep beans covered by at least 1 inch of water.
Once beans are fork tender add the coconut milk and continue cooking until milk is no longer white and has taken on the color of the beans.
Add the rice, cover and cook another 15 minutes or until rice is done.
Remove from heat immediately let pot sit at least 5 minutes. Remove thyme sprigs an scotch bonnet pepper before serving.

Jamaican Steamed Cabbage


Jamaican Steamed Cabbage

6 Servings
Ingredients
2 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium bell pepper, sliced
1 scotch bonnet pepper, seeded, minced
1 medium onion, sliced
2 sprig thyme
1 bay leaf
1 medium cabbage
2 teaspoons granulated garlic
Freshly ground pepper and salt to taste
¼ cup water

Method
Wash cabbage, cut up/slice as desired
In a large pan, heat oil, add peppers, onions, thyme and bay leaf saute until onions are wilted.
Add cabbage, seasoning and, cover saucepan and cook until cabbage is tender. Approximately 15 minutes.
Remove thyme sprigs and bay leaf before serving

Monday, September 24, 2012

10 Weird and Gross Ingredients in Processed Food

Reprinted from: http://webecoist.momtastic.com/2009/05/08/10-weird-and-gross-ingredients-in-processed-food/

I don't understand why I let things like this surprise me. -  Joyce

Foods Containing Beaver Anal Glands




Everyone now knows that processed and fast foods are not the bastions of nutrition, but that shouldn’t make these ingredients found inside them any less revolting inside or out of your home kitchen. This list sends a clear message: when a packaged food contains more than five ingredients and includes some that are difficult to pronounce, stay away. Make a b-line straight to the organics
aisle and go for vegan meals or vegetarian recipes instead.

Fertilizer in Subway Sandwich Rolls
While chemical fertilizers inevitably make it into our produce in trace amounts, you would not expect it to be a common food additive. However, ammonium sulfate can be found inside many brands of bread, including Subway’s. The chemical provides nitrogen for the yeast, creating a more consistent product.

Beaver Anal Glands in Raspberry Candy
The anal glands of a beaver, conveniently euphemized as castoreum, are a common ingredient in perfumes and colognes but are also sometimes used to — believe it or not — enhance the flavor of raspberry candies and sweets.

Beef Fat in All Hostess Products
While this may not bother the most ardent omnivore, others are shocked to discover that their favorite childhood treats contain straight-up beef fat. The ingredient comes included a list of other oils that may or may not be used, so it is always a gamble! It is enough to make some of us want to go vegan.

Crushed Bugs as Red Food Coloring
After killing thousands at a time, the dried insects are boiled to produce a liquid solution that can be turned to a dye using a variety of treatments. Some people worry that the coloring — often called carmine or carminic acid — could be listed as a “natural color,” disguising the fact that there are bugs in the product.

Beetle Juice in Sprinkles and Candies
You know that shiny coating on candies like Skittles? Or the sprinkles on cupcakes and ice cream sundaes? Well, they get that glaze from the secretions of the female lac beetle. The substance is also known as shellac and commonly used as a wood varnish.

Sheep Secretions in Bubble Gum
The oils inside sheep’s wool are collected to create the goopy substance called lanolin. From there, it ends up in chewing gum (sometimes under the guise of “gum base”), but also is used to create vitamin D3 supplements.

Human Hair and/or Duck Feathers in Bread
What’s in your morning bagel? If you get it from Noah’s Bagels, it contains either human hair or duck feathers, and it’s your guess as to which. The substance, called L-cysteine or cystine, is used as a dough conditioner to produce a specific consistency. While artificial cysteine is available, it is cost prohibitive and mostly used to create kosher and halal products.

Coal Tar in Red-Colored Candy
Coal tar is listed as number 199 on the United Nations list of “dangerous goods,” but that doesn’t stop people from using it in food. The coloring Allura Red AC is derived from coal tar and is commonly found in red-colored candies, sodas and other sweets.

Calf Stomach in Many Cheeses
In the UK, all cheeses are labeled as either suitable or not suitable for vegetarians because in Britain — and everywhere else — many cheeses are made using rennet, which is the fourth stomach of a young cow. In the United States and most other countries, people are left to guess about the stomach-content of their cheese.

Sand in Wendy’s Chili
Sand is hidden in Wendy’s chili as a name you might remember from high school chemistry class: silicon dioxide. Apparently they use sand as an “anti-caking agent,” perhaps to make sure the chili can last for days and days over a heater. Skip it, cook yourself a quick vegetarian meal instead this Thanksgiving.
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