Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Want the Cure? Eat Your Vegetables!

On The Menu

                                      Clean your liver with cruciferous greens

Angelique
As a child, can you remember the number of times you heard your mom say these words?
Joyce
Eat your vegetables!
Angelique
As an adult, I got to wondering if some vegetables score more points than others.  I mean, if I have to eat them, I don't want to waste my time on the ones that don't work.
Joyce
You are so silly.  All vegetables "work" and the best course is to diversify.
Angelique
Yeah, Mom's plate looks like the rainbow song.  She's got red and yellow and pink and green.
Joyce
I've never had pink vegetables.  But since we're on the topic, the magic color is GREEN.
Angelique
Everything I've read about cancer prevention says GO GREEN.
Joyce
And remember what Dr. Oz said in your last interview?
Angelique
He said cruciferous greens cleanse and can restore the liver.  The liver is the body's filter.  The better it works, the better you work.
Joyce
So eat your GREENS.
Angelique
And purple and orange and blue.
Joyce
You know people are reading this, right?  Anyway, check out Angelique's latest sit down with Dr. Oz and then pull up a sauce pan and try these greens.

Soulful Eating!
Angelique & Joyce  


4 – 6 Servings

Ingredients
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion, sliced
3 - 4 cloves garlic, sliced
1 medium - large bell pepper, sliced
1 teaspoon sea salt - Divided
2 pounds Swiss chard
½ cup orange juice or 1 large orange, juiced
1 teaspoon pepper
2 teaspoons granulated garlic
2 teaspoons oregano or any dried herb

Method
Heat the olive oil in a large skillet or wok.  Add the onions, garlic cloves, bell pepper and ¼ teaspoon salt. 
Saute over medium heat until the onions are slightly brown in color, do not let them burn. 
Add the orange juice, ½ teaspoon sea salt, pepper and dry herb; mix until all ingredients are well incorporated.  
Bring pan up to a boil, reduce heat to medium low, cover and cook 15 – 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.  
That is a sufficient amount of time for the greens to be done. 
Taste for flavor and adjust seasoning accordingly.

 8 Servings

Ingredients
2 pounds green beans, trimmed, halved
1 bay leaf
1 ½ tablespoon olive oil
1 large onion, thinly sliced
½ teaspoon crushed red peppers
½ teaspoon sea salt

Method
Bring a large saucepan of water to a boil. Add beans and bay leaf, cook for 5 minutes. Plunge beans into ice water; drain and discard bay leaf.
Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add oil, onions and chili peppers and sauté 30 seconds.
Add beans; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cook 2 minutes, tossing frequently. 

Broccoli Rabe Asian Style
4 Servings

Ingredients 
1 ½ pound broccoli rabe

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 tablespoon garlic, sliced
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
½ teaspoon crushed red chili peppers
2 tablespoons tamari (soy sauce)

Method
Prepare an ice water bath by filling a bowl halfway with ice and water; set aside.
Fill a large pot with heavily salted water and bring to a boil over high heat.
Cook the broccoli rabe for 2 minutes.
Drain the broccoli rabe and place in the ice water bath until cool.
Remove, shake off excess water and set aside.
Place a large frying pan over medium-high heat and add the oil.
Add the garlic, ginger and crushed red chili peppers, saute for 3 minutes.
Add the broccoli rabe and soy sauce and cook, stirring occasionally, until heated through, about 5 minutes.
Taste, adjust the seasoning as needed, and serve.
 






Swiss Chard with Onions, Peppers & Garlic

4 – 6 Servings

Ingredients
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion, sliced
3 - 4 cloves garlic, sliced
1 medium - large bell pepper, sliced
1 teaspoon sea salt - Divided
2 pounds Swiss chard
½ cup orange juice or 1 large orange, juiced
1 teaspoon pepper
2 teaspoons granulated garlic
2 teaspoons oregano or any dried herb

Method
Heat the olive oil in a large skillet or wok.  Add the onions, garlic cloves, bell pepper and ¼ teaspoon salt. 
Saute over medium heat until the onions are slightly brown in color, do not let them burn. 
Add the orange juice, ½ teaspoon sea salt, pepper and dry herb; mix until all ingredients are well incorporated.  
Bring pan up to a boil, reduce heat to medium low, cover and cook 15 – 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.  
That is a sufficient amount of time for the greens to be done. 
Taste for flavor and adjust seasoning accordingly.

Green Beans with Onions and Chili Flakes


8 Servings

Ingredients
2 pounds green beans, trimmed, halved
1 bay leaf
1 ½ tablespoon olive oil
1 large onion, thinly sliced
½ teaspoon crushed red peppers
½ teaspoon sea salt

Method
Bring a large saucepan of water to a boil. Add beans and bay leaf, cook for 5 minutes. Plunge beans into ice water; drain and discard bay leaf.
Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add oil, onions and chili peppers and sauté 30 seconds.
Add beans; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cook 2 minutes, tossing frequently.

Broccoli Rabe Asian Style


Broccoli Rabe Asian Style
4 Servings

Ingredients  
1 ½ pound broccoli rabe
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon garlic, sliced
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
½ teaspoon crushed red chili peppers
2 tablespoons tamari (soy sauce)

Method
Prepare an ice water bath by filling a bowl halfway with ice and water; set aside.
Fill a large pot with heavily salted water and bring to a boil over high heat.
Cook the broccoli rabe for 2 minutes.
Drain the broccoli rabe and place in the ice water bath until cool.
Remove, shake off excess water and set aside.
Place a large frying pan over medium-high heat and add the oil.
Add the garlic, ginger and crushed red chili peppers, saute for 3 minutes.
Add the broccoli rabe and soy sauce and cook, stirring occasionally, until heated through, about 5 minutes.
Taste, adjust the seasoning as needed, and serve.
 







Sunday, October 28, 2012

The Health Dangers of Soy




Who hasn't heard of the marvels of soy? The marketing bandwagon has touted soy as the perfect health food for decades. But could something that sounds so healthful actually be dangerous?
If you take the time to look into the actual science, then the answer is yes. Thousands of studies link soy to malnutrition, digestive distress, immune system breakdown, thyroid dysfunction, cognitive decline, reproductive disorders and infertility -- even cancer and heart disease.
One of the primary reasons it would be wise for you to avoid soy is that more than 90 percent of soybeans grown in the United States are genetically modified. Since the introduction of genetically engineered foods in 1996, we've had an upsurge in low birth weight babies, infertility, and other problems in the U.S., and animal studies have shown devastating effects from genetically engineered soy including allergies, sterility, birth defects, and offspring death rates up to five times higher than normal.
Soybean crops are also heavily sprayed with chemical herbicides, such glyphosate, which a French team of researchers have found to be carcinogenic.
Soybeans -- even organically grown soybeans -- naturally contain "antinutrients" such as saponins, soyatoxin, phytates, trypsin inhibitors, goitrogens and phytoestrogens. Traditional fermentation destroys these antinutrients, which allows your body to enjoy soy's nutritional benefits. However, most Westerners do not consume fermented soy, but rather unfermented soy, mostly in the form of soymilk, tofu, TVP, and soy infant formula.
Unfermented soy has the following 10 adverse affects on your body:

1. High Phytic Acid (Phytates): Reduces assimilation of calcium, magnesium, copper, iron and zinc. Phytic acid in soy is not neutralized by ordinary preparation methods such as soaking, sprouting and long, slow cooking, but only with long fermentation. High-phytate diets have caused growth problems in children.
2. Trypsin inhibitors: Interferes with protein digestion and may cause pancreatic disorders. In test animals, trypsin inhibitors in soy caused stunted growth.
3. Goitrogens: Potent agents that block your synthesis of thyroid hormones and can cause hypothyroidism and thyroid cancer. In infants, consumption of soy formula has been linked with autoimmune thyroid disease. Goitrogens interfere with iodine metabolism.
4. Phytoestrogens/Isoflavones: Plant compounds resembling human estrogen can block your normal estrogen and disrupt endocrine function, cause infertility, and increase your risk for breast cancer.
5. Hemagglutinin: A clot-promoting substance that causes your red blood cells to clump, making them unable to properly absorb and distribute oxygen to your tissues.
6. Synthetic Vitamin D: Soy foods increase your body's vitamin D requirement, which is why companies add synthetic vitamin D2 to soymilk (a toxic form of vitamin D).
7. Vitamin B12: Soy contains a compound resembling vitamin B12 that cannot be used by your body, so soy foods can actually contribute to B12 deficiency, especially among vegans.
8. Protein Denaturing: Fragile proteins are denatured during high temperature processing to make soy protein isolate and textured vegetable protein (TVP). Chemical processing of soy protein results in the formation of toxic lysinoalanine and highly carcinogenic nitrosamines.
9. MSG: Free glutamic acid, or MSG, is a potent neurotoxin. MSG is formed during soy food processing, plus additional MSG is often added to mask soy's unpleasant taste.
10. Aluminum and Manganese: Soy foods contain high levels of aluminum, which is toxic to your nervous system and kidneys, and manganese, which wreaks havoc on your baby's immature metabolic system.
Soy's antinutrients are quite potent. Drinking just two glasses of soymilk daily provides enough of these compounds to alter a woman's menstrual cycle. But if you feed soy to your infant or child, these effects are magnified a thousand-fold. Infants fed soy formula may have up to 20,000 times more estrogen circulating through their bodies as those fed other formulas. You should NEVER feed your infant a soy-based formula!
In fact, infants fed soy formula take in an estimated five birth control pills' worth of estrogen every day.
As dangerous as unfermented soy is, fermented soy from organic soybeans is a different story altogether and can be a beneficial part of your diet. Fermented soy is a great source of vitamin K2, and K2 (combined with vitamin D) is essential in preventing osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, dementia, and various types of cancer.
Note that tofu is NOT on this list and is among the soy foods I do not recommend. Traditionally fermented soy products include:
  • Miso
  • Tempeh
  • Natto
  • Soy sauce (as long as it's fermented in the traditional way, and not all are)
Contrary to what you may have heard, Asians do not consume large amounts of soy. They use small amounts as a condiment (about two teaspoons daily), but not as a primary protein source. And the type of soy they consume is traditionally fermented soy.

For more information about the health problems you may confront related to dietary soy, I invite you to download my free comprehensive soy report.
For more by Dr. Joseph Mercola, click here.
For more on diet and nutrition, click here.
Follow Dr. Joseph Mercola on Twitter: www.twitter.com/mercola

Saturday, October 27, 2012

Sunday Dinner Oct 28.2012

On the Menu



Roasted Butternut Squash Soup
Yields 8 - 10 servings

Ingredients

4 pounds butternut squash
1 jumbo sweet potato
1 tablespoon sea salt – Divided
1 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon granulated garlic
¼ cup olive oil – Divided
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon pumpkin spice mix
1 gallon vegetable broth – recipe to follow
Preparation
Preheat oven to 450 degrees
Slice squash lengthwise and remove seeds 

Wash sweet potato and cut in half lengthwise

Brush the inside of the potato & squash lightly with olive oil then sprinkle lightly with salt, pepper and garlic powder. 

Bake in oven 45 minutes or until tender.  The potato will get done before the squash, so remove it when it’s done. 

Once they are cool enough to handle, remove skin from the potato and scoop the squash out of its skin with a tablespoon.  Mash both the potato and squash with a potato masher. 
Add vegetable broth to a large stockpot and place over medium heat. 
Add mashed vegetables to the broth. 

Sprinkle in the remaining salt, coriander and pumpkin spice then mix thoroughly. 

Bring soup to a boil then reduce heat to medium low.  Cook uncovered 30 - 45 minutes or until soup thickens, stirring occasionally. 

If you have an immersion blender (hand blender), puree the soup in the pot. 

If you do not have an immersion blender, transfer soup in batches to a food processor or blender and puree; then return it to the pot. 

Check for seasoning and add pumpkin spice/salt – ½ teaspoon at a time if needed. 

Bring the soup back up to a boil then reduce heat to medium low. 

Continue cooking uncovered an additional 15 minutes or until it reaches the desired thickness.  Keep in mind that once the soup sets, it will become twice as thick.
 Watercress and Spinach Salad Vegan
 6 Servings
Ingredients 
6 ounces, watercress, washed, drained
10 ounces baby spinach, washed, drained
3 tablespoons fresh mint
½ cup baby tomatoes cut into quarters
1 cucumber, diced
1 red pepper, sliced or diced
1 tablespoon lime juice
¼ cup freshly squeezed orange juice
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
½ teaspoon sea salt
½ teaspoon granulated garlic
½ teaspoon crushed red chili peppers
1 avocado cut into a fan
freshly ground black pepper 

Method
Combine watercress, spinach, mint, tomatoes, cucumbers and red peppers in a large bowl.
Combine lime juice, orange juice, olive oil, salt, garlic, crushed red chili peppers in a blender and puree until all ingredients are thoroughly combined.
Just before serving toss the salad with the dressing.
Cut the avocado and place on top of the salad, squirt with some lime juice.
Coat with freshly ground black pepper.
Cashew Crusted Tilapia
4 Servings

Ingredients:
4 – 6 oz tilapia fillets
1 lemon
1 cup cashew, chopped
1 cup panko bread crumbs
¼ - ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
½ cup flour 
½ teaspoon sea salt
½ teaspoon garlic powder
½ teaspoon onion powder
2 egg whites

Preparation:
            Preheat oven to 400 degrees
            Line or oil a sheet pan and set aside          
Rinse tilapia and pat dry with a paper towel.
Cut lemon in half and squeeze juice over each fillet both sides and set aside.
Place cashews, panko and cayenne pepper in a food processor and run until cashews are finely chopped then pour on to a plate. 
Mix together the flour, sea salt, garlic powder and onion powder then pour mixture on another plate.
Whisk together egg whites in a bowl large enough to fit 1 fillet. 
Pat dry fillets and dredge in flour (fish should be covered in a fine dust layer of flour). 
Dip fillets in egg white, shake off excess egg.    
Press fillets firmly into cashew mixture until both sides are coated.
Place fillets on an oiled sheet pan then bake in a preheated 400 degree oven 15 - 20 minutes.

Note: Rule of thumb for cooking fish:  Cook for 10 minutes per inch of thickness.  So if the fillet is 1 ½” thick, cook it for 15 minutes.
Citrus Roasted Asparagus
6 – 8 Servings
Instructions
2 bunches asparagus
¼ cup olive oil
¼ cup fresh orange juice
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
¼ teaspoon sea salt
½ teaspoon crushed red chili peppers
oranges or lemon slices

Method
Preheat oven 400 degrees.
Wash and trim off bottom of asparagus.
Combine olive oil, orange and lemon juice, balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper.
Toss asparagus with dressing.
Place asparagus on sheet pan, top with orange or lemon slices and roast in oven 9 – 10 minutes or until asparagus is slightly brown.


Garlic Mashed Potatoes
4 - 6 Servings
Ingredients
2 pounds organic red skin potatoes
Water to cover

1 bay leaf

3 large garlic cloves
¼ teaspoon mustard powder


½ teaspoon sea salt
½ cup vegan mayonnaise

¼ cup of the liquid potatoes were cooked in

Method


Wash/scrub potatoes and cut them into equal size.
Cover with cold water then add bay leaf and garlic cloves, bring to a boil.
Cook for 15 minutes or until potatoes are fork tender.
Drain potatoes and reserve 1 cup of the cooking liquid.
Remove and discard the bay leaf.
Place the potatoes, mustard powder, sea salt, vegan mayonnaise in a mixing bowl with a paddle.
Mix just long enough for potatoes to reach a creamy consistency. Add cooking liquid 
¼ cup at a time if needed.  
If you process too long potatoes will become sticky and gooey rather than light and fluffy.

You can also use a potato masher to cream the potatoes.  Just be careful not to over mix the potatoes, you want them to be light and fluffy.




Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Something Warm for a Fall Day

On the Menu


Angelique
I love fall.  Even though it's still 85 degrees here in Los Angeles, I've started whipping up our yummy soups.
Mom
And don't forget those 1 Dish Meals.  They're great this time of year.  
Angelique
What's really great is you can cook them in large quantities and then store them for the winter.
Mom
The key is in how you store them.  I find it quick and simple just to freeze.  I use 32 ounce Ball canning jars as freezer containers.  But here is a guide to the correct way to freeze foods.
Angelique
She has 13 of them in the freezer right now.  We pop them out, thaw them and it's enough for us to enjoy for a few days.  But not so much we get sick of it.
Mom 
These are all meatless dishes, but you know the rule.
Angelique
If you must, add some grilled chicken to the roasted ratatouille.  Or some plump turkey meatballs to the Spaghetti.
Mom
Whatever you do, keep it fresh and healthy.

Soulful Eating!
Angelique & Joyce

 Black Bean Soup with Roasted Vegetables
8 Servings
Ingredients
6 tomatoes cut in half
1large onion, cut into quarters, with core in tact
6 garlic cloves, peeled
1 bell pepper, seeded, halved
1 tablespoons olive oil
½ teaspoon sea salt
½  teaspoon granulated garlic
1 chipotle chili with adobo sauce
4 cups black beans, drained and rinsed
2 teaspoons chili powder
2 teaspoons cumin
1 teaspoon oregano
¼ cup cilantro, coarsely chopped 
1 avocado for garnish

Method
Preheat an oven to 350 degrees F.
Place the tomatoes, onion and garlic into a large bowl. Toss with the olive oil and season with salt, pepper and granulated garlic to taste.
Transfer vegetables to a 2 sheet pans then roast for 30 minutes, or until vegetables turn slightly brown.
Transfer the roasted vegetables to a large saucepan over medium heat; add the vegetable broth, chipotle pepper with 1 teaspoon adobo sauce, beans, chili powder, cumin and oregano.
Simmer  on low for about 30 minutes.
Transfer the soup to a blender or food processor along with the fresh cilantro and puree. 
Garnish with slices of avocado .

Roasted Ratatouille
6 Servings

Ingredients
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 lemon, juiced
½ teaspoon sea salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
3 medium zucchini, ½ inch dice
2 medium eggplants, ½ inch dice
2 red bell peppers, ½ inch dice
1 medium onion, ½ inch dice
4 medium tomatoes, ½ inch dice
6 cloves garlic, halved
½ pound fresh okra, halved
28 ounce can diced tomatoes
1 tablespoon tomato paste
¼ cup basil, chopped
2 springs of fresh thyme
handful fresh parsley, chopped

Method
Preheat oven 400 degrees F

In a large bowl whisk together the olive oil, lemon juice, salt, pepper and cayenne pepper.
Add the zucchini, eggplant, peppers, onion, garlic, tomatoes and okra toss by hand until all vegetables are well coated.
Place vegetables on 2 sheet pans and roast for 20 minutes.
Combine all ingredient in a large oven proof skillet and bake in oven uncovered for 30 minutes, taste for seasoning and adjust with salt and pepper if needed.
Remove thyme stems before serving.

Note:  I like my ratatouille served over pasta or brown rice.

 
Spaghetti with Red Sauce
4 – 6 Servings
           
Ingredients
1 (28-ounce) can whole tomatoes
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
⅓ red onion, medium diced
3 cloves garlic, sliced into chunks
¼ teaspoon crushed red chili peppers
2 handful fresh basil, torn
½ teaspoon seal salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 pound spaghetti, for serving
Freshly grated Parmesan cheese, for serving

Method
In a food processor, puree the tomatoes to a smooth creamy consistency.
Add olive oil to a large pan over medium heat. Once hot, add the onions and saute until they are soft, add the garlic and crushed red chili pepper
Add the tomatoes and season with salt and pepper.
Simmer on a medium-low flame for about a half hour or until sauce thickens. The sauce should still be liquid but not look overly wet.
Cook 1 pound of spaghetti until it’s al dente about 6 minute.  Drain and add to the sauce, season with salt and mix thoroughly.
A few minutes before taking the sauce off the fire, add half the basil and season with salt and pepper.
Serve with some freshly grated Parmesan and a couple of leaves of basil.